Coronary heart disease patients' compliance with dietary recommendations: Does trust matter?

Author: Samantha Beth Meyer

Meyer, Samantha Beth, 2011 Coronary heart disease patients' compliance with dietary recommendations: Does trust matter?, Flinders University, School of Medicine

This electronic version is made publicly available by Flinders University in accordance with its open access policy for student theses. Copyright in this thesis remains with the author. This thesis may incorporate third party material which has been used by the author pursuant to Fair Dealing exceptions. If you are the owner of any included third party copyright material and/or you believe that any material has been made available without permission of the copyright owner please contact copyright@flinders.edu.au with the details.

Abstract

Recent theoretical and applied International literature has suggested that trust in healthcare is declining. This thesis investigates the apparent decline by researching the role of trust in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients' compliance with dietary recommendations. This thesis also investigates the practical application of social theories of trust. At present, social theories of trust do not provide a practical framework for applied investigation. This thesis is a means of theoretical development with regard to social theories of trust. A total of 37 qualitative interviews in South Australia and 1044 quantitative surveys were collected from a national sample as a means of investigating social theories of trust. The qualitative findings indicate that people with CHD trust healthcare professionals and the healthcare system. It was also found that in situations of risk, individuals are dependent on the healthcare system and healthcare professionals; they do not reflexively 'trust'. In addition, the findings suggest that trust may play a role in compliance but that risk and reflexivity are central to understanding the concept of compliance. Quantitative results indicate that Australians have high levels of trust in organisations and individuals but that specific demographic factors can be used to predict levels of trust. Respondents who are females, have a chronic health condition, a high annual household income, living in advantaged areas are the most likely to distrust doctors, among other groups of individuals and organisations. The findings suggest that current social theories of trust do not provide a practical framework for investigating trust in social health research. Findings have led to the development of a more comprehensive model of trust that may be used for future research on trust in healthcare.

Keywords: trust,risk,dependence,coronary heart disease,social theory,Giddens,Luhmann
Subject: Public Health thesis

Thesis type: Doctor of Philosophy
Completed: 2011
School: School of Medicine
Supervisor: Professor Paul Ward