Third Generation Ethnic-cultural Identities within a Diaspora and Multi-ethnic Context: A Greek-Australian Adolescent Case Study

Author: Chrysanthi Baltatzi

Baltatzi, Chrysanthi, 2015 Third Generation Ethnic-cultural Identities within a Diaspora and Multi-ethnic Context: A Greek-Australian Adolescent Case Study, Flinders University, School of Humanities and Creative Arts

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Abstract

This dissertation examines the perceptions by Greek-Australian adolescents concerning their ethnic-cultural identity and the ethnic-cultural lives of their families. Also, it considers the relevant contribution of the Greek language education agency. The ethno-cultural identity of Greek-Australian adolescents displays hybrid diversity, primarily exhibiting symbolic contact with the Greek lifestyle and to a lesser extent as Greek-centered means. The sample demonstrates significant emotional connection with the Greek culture, even where the level of Greek practices and Greek language is minimally manifested. The family emerges as the key cornerstone in their ethno-cultural upbringing, whilst school education serves a complementary role. The prospect for Greek Australian adolescents to develop a meaningful ethic-cultural identity constitutes a realistic objective, contingent on whether Greek-Australian families approach their role as a privilege and responsibility. This role is further supported by Greek-Australian associations and educational institutions, as well as by Australian and Greek educational authorities.

Keywords: hybrid identity Greek-Australian adolescents
Subject: Modern Greek thesis

Thesis type: Doctor of Philosophy
Completed: 2015
School: School of Humanities and Creative Arts
Supervisor: Michael.Tsianikas