Evaluating the effectiveness of EIA system in Vietnam: a synthesis approach of key stakeholder perspectives and content analysis

Author: Chi Cong Vu

  • Thesis download: available for open access on 12 Dec 2019.

Vu, Chi Cong, 2016 Evaluating the effectiveness of EIA system in Vietnam: a synthesis approach of key stakeholder perspectives and content analysis, Flinders University, School of the Environment

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Abstract

Vietnam has adopted Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as its key instrument for environmental management since 1993. Since then, Vietnam’s EIA system has undergone numerous major improvements via a number of legislative documents such as the Law on Environmental Protection in 2005, and 2014 and many associated circulars and decrees. Country wide thousands of development proposals are required to undertake EIA each year. Currently, Vietnam has a relatively strong legal framework for the implementation of EIA; however, as with other developing countries, its performance in practice faces several challenges. Therefore, its contributions to the decision making process for development activities are questionable. This research project aims to evaluate comprehensively the quality of the EIA system in Vietnam to find out why gaps remain between theory and practice. Based on the evaluation appropriate recommendations are proposed to improve the system.

Keywords: Environmental Impact Assessment, EIA, EIA system, effectiveness, Vietnam, developing countries, stakeholders perspectives
Subject: Environmental management thesis

Thesis type: Masters
Completed: 2016
School: School of the Environment
Supervisor: Assoc. Prof. Beverley Clarke